Herpes Tips

Vaccinations – Dogs / Cats / Rabbits

For the first few weeks of life, your pet is usually protected against disease by the immunity they receive in their mother ́s milk. They have done more to prevent disease and improve well-being than even antibiotics or surgery. Having a yearly vaccination is a vital opportunity for the vet to perform a thorough health check, often allowing us to pick up problems early and discuss any concerns you may have. However, there are other important aspects of routine care which should help to keep your cat in good health for many years to come. Distemper is a virus that is easily spread from dog to dog, via the respiratory system and is usually fatal. New WSAVA guidelines recommend a titre test once a year rather than routinely giving dogs/cats a booster. We humans love our holidays because they provide a welcome break from our normal daily routines, but it can be a very stressful time for our pets who may find a change to their normal routine very unsettling and this may present itself as behavioural changes and even a loss of appetite.

Continued vaccination of as many dogs as possible is, however, necessary if distemper is to remain under control. Boarding kennels may insist dogs are given kennel cough vaccination to stay with them. This is because they have antibodies in their bloodstream ready to fight. It spreads through the air, particularly when dogs cough. The vaccination is very effective. In the last edition of CHC Update, I suggested that although we and other informed pet guardians were happy about the anti-booster letter in Veterinary Times, nothing much was likely to change. The bacteria needs a moist environment to survive therefore dogs spending a lot of time around water are most at risk.

I looked at homeopathic treatments & on advice from a homeopath I started my girl on Sepia 30c for 10 days every month until she came into season where at which point you stop. Vaccination is very good but only lasts 1 year, dogs at higher risk need vaccinating more often. Kennel Cough (infectious tracheobronchitis) – Kennel cough I caused by a combination of bacteria and viruses including: canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus 2 and Bordetella. From around the age of 5-8months kittens reach sexual maturity and are therefore capable of breeding and producing kittens themselves. It is also highly infectious and spreads rapidly through dogs coming into close contact e.g. in kennels. Rabies – vaccination against rabies is unnecessary in the UK as we are free from Rabies.

The proportion of the population that must be vaccinated for herd immunity to work depends on the prevalence of the disease, the effectiveness of the vaccine, and other factors, but in most cases more than 90% of individuals must be vaccinated for those who are not to be protected. Establish a routine from day one, puppies and kittens often defaecate after eating or waking up. Some puppies do not have good protection from their mother and so benefit from early vaccination. This is so that they are protected fully by the time they can start going out and about at 13 weeks of age. These diseases are mainly transmitted from wild rabbits although insects can carry both diseases, so even house rabbits are still at risk. Vaccines offer very good protection however on some occasions an individual dog may not get full protection from the vaccine. This is usually because the dog was already ill or stressed at the time of injection.

The vet will examine your dog before they give the injection and any concerns from the owner should be raised at this time. Feline Panleucopaenia (feline distemper/feline infectious enteritis) – feline panleucopaenia virus causes severe vomiting and diarrhoea leading to a potentially fatal dehydration within 2-3 days. Kittens and young cats are particularly at risk. The virus is spread in infected faeces but vaccination provides good protection. Swollen nipples: Sometimes, but not always, the nipples and breasts will swell slightly. It is rarely fatal except in those otherwise unwell, elderly or very young. We asked, if your dog is ill, when did he become ill in relation to the vaccine?

This means they pose a risk to any unvaccinated cat. Feline Leukaemia (FeLV) – not all cats infected with the virus get the disease but those that do often die. The disease destroys the cat’s defences against other disease and can lead to cancer which is often fatal. The virus spreads by direct contact with other cats so any cat going outside is at risk. Rabies – vaccination against rabies is unnecessary in the UK as we are free from Rabies. The vet examined her. Kittens are protected from infectious diseases by the antibodies in their mother’s milk, once these antibodies reduce the kitten will make their own antibodies to protect them against disease.

Some kittens do not have good protection from their mother and so benefit from early vaccination. For most kittens the first injection is given at 9 weeks old with the second vaccination at around 12 weeks old (12 weeks old is the earliest a second vaccination can be given). So do your best to avoid all stress on the bitch. Vaccines offer very good protection however on some occasions an individual cat may not get full protection from the vaccine. This is usually because the cat was already ill or stressed at the time of injection. The vet will examine your cat before they give the injection and any concerns from the owner should be raised at this time. There are several highly infectious and potentially fatal diseases that can affect your rabbit.

Luckily a vaccination is available to protect your rabbit against the 2 most prevalent. It is essential that your rabbit receives regular booster injections to ensure they are fully protected. Myxomatosis – a disease caused by a virus that only affects rabbits. The virus causes a very severe swelling of the lips eyelids and genitals. Wild rabbits suffering from the disease are most at risk of being caught by predators. Pet rabbits can sometimes recover with very intensive nursing if the disease is caught early. Insects transmit the virus between rabbits including flies and rabbit fleas.

Cats can sometimes carry the rabbit flea so a house rabbit is still at risk of catching the disease. There is no cure for FIV and it cannot be caught by humans or other pets. It causes massive haemorrhage (bleeding) from the internal organs leading to a rapid death. The virus is spread rabbit to rabbit but also on contaminated equipment, clothing and feed; insects’ rodents and birds may also transmit the virus. A combined Myxomatosis and VHD vaccination can be given from 10 weeks of age. Scott Zverblis spoke to award winning Radio DJ and TV presenter, Neil Fox, before of his stint as a DJ on the Houndwaves Radio station at Crufts.